Kvinner, migrasjon og flukt

Women, migration and escape

bookmark

Migration in a gender perspective

fredag 8. mars 2019, kl. 09:00 til kl. 10:30

Sal: Wergeland

Arrangør: Utenriksdepartementet

Inngang: Gratis med påmelding

This page is not available in English. Below is the Norwegian page translated by Google.

Welcome to the panel debate on the very day of Women's Day on women, migration and escape. Foreign Minister Ine Eriksen Søreide , IOM Director-General António Vitorino and Norwegian Red Cross President Robert Mood participate in the panel.

Chair: Norway's Special Representative for Women, Peace and Security, Marita Sørheim-Rensvik

Coffee, tea and croissants are served from 7 p.m. 0830. The debate starts exactly 09:00. The event is in English.

Free and open to everyone! Sign up here.

According to the International Migration Organization (IOM), there are 244 million international migrants in the world today. Women and girls make up almost half of these. Many seek new opportunities and a better life for themselves and their families. Others are forced to travel because of disasters, war and conflict.

According to the International Migration Organization (IOM), there are 244 million international migrants in the world today. Women and girls make up almost half of these. Many seek new opportunities and a better life for themselves and their families. Others are forced to travel because of disasters, war and conflict.

The gender perspective is central to understanding the causes and consequences of migration, whether forced or voluntary, or a combination. Gender affects why people migrate, who migrates and where they travel, what networks they make use of, what opportunities they have at the point of arrival and what relationship they have with the country of origin.

Many migrant women leave home and family to find work outside the country. They contribute over $ 2.3 billion to the world economy. Migrant women often have to take low-income jobs in sectors with weak regulation, weak protection and rights, such as farm workers, maids, in the service sector and the sex industry. They are often subjected to discrimination, as women, as vulnerable migrants and as workers with poor protection. Many migrant women are also vulnerable to human trafficking, trafficking, modern slavery, exploitation and abuse.

When human and labor rights are safeguarded, migration can contribute to increased opportunities and better living conditions for the individual migrant. Migrants active in the labor market contribute to the development of the host country's economy and welfare. Migration has given women increased opportunities for education and work and in some cases also the opportunity to break out of traditional and discriminatory local structures. Migration can therefore also give the individual increased political and social status, higher quality of life and dignity.

How can host countries and the international community contribute to policy development, aid and humanitarian measures that best safeguard the gender perspective? Which actors and arenas are central to such a collaboration? It is invited to debate in the House of Literature with Foreign Minister Ine Eriksen Søreide, IOM Director General Antonio Vitorino and Red Cross President Robert Mood.

Happy Women's Day! Welcome!